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The Resource Across the blue Pacific : a World War II story, by Louise Borden ; illustrated by Robert Andrew Parker

Across the blue Pacific : a World War II story, by Louise Borden ; illustrated by Robert Andrew Parker

Label
Across the blue Pacific : a World War II story
Title
Across the blue Pacific
Title remainder
a World War II story
Statement of responsibility
by Louise Borden ; illustrated by Robert Andrew Parker
Creator
Contributor
Illustrator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
A woman reminisces about her neighbor's son who was the object of a letter writing campaign by some fourth-graders when he went away to war in 1943
Review
  • /*Starred Review*/ Gr. 3-5. In this fully illustrated, fictional memoir, a woman, Molly, recalls her childhood war years on the American home front. World War II seems far away to Molly, but her fourth-grade teacher brings it close by painting an enormous map on the wall so that the class can follow its progress, and asking the children to write letters to the servicemen. Molly writes to her next-door neighbor Ted, a friendly young man on a submarine in the Pacific. Unfortunately, Ted does not come home, but the war ends and life goes on. Beautifully written in an understated tone, the story offers a believable picture of life during the war. Tangible details of everyday activities make the arrival of the telegram relaying Teds death and the reactions of his family and friends all the more poignant. A typical page of text, formed into free-verse stanzas, faces a full-page watercolor painting illustrating a scene in the childrens school or neighborhood or, in a few instances, showing a submarine in the Pacific. Restrained yet expressive, the artwork conveys moods and mindsets as well as a strong sense of the time and place. The relatively short, graceful text and the evocative art offer an effective introduction to the period and to the profound effects that even a faraway war can have on those at home. -- Carolyn Phelan (Reviewed 04-01-2006) (Booklist, vol 102, number 15, p42)
  • Gr 2-5 –The author of The Greatest Skating Race (S & S, 2004) has teamed up with Parker to produce a successful and moving piece of historical fiction. This story is told as an American girl’s reminiscence of her experiences during World War II. Molly’s much-admired neighbor, “navy man” Ted Walker, is serving on a submarine in the Pacific, but to her, “Orchard Road seemed the safest place on earth, and the war...well, the war was something far away.” The text is deceptively simple and understated. Borden evokes the era through small details, word choices, and descriptions of everyday activities, such as building a snowman, the first day of school, writing letters to Ted, and spending summer days on the porch drinking lemonade and listening to baseball games on the radio. The war remains distant until the fateful telegram arrives. Parker alternates scenes of Molly’s life with images of Ted on the USS Albacore . The artist’s characteristic loose-lined ink-and-watercolor paintings capture the sense of a once-secure and orderly world becoming less stable. The lyrical prose and evocative pictures create a poignant slice-of-life tale that resonates with the emotions of the friends and family members on the homefront. The story will provide a human perspective to nonfiction accounts and may also touch a chord with children who have loved ones serving abroad.–Heide Piehler, Shorewood Public Library, WI --Heide Piehler (Reviewed May 1, 2006) (School Library Journal, vol 52, issue 5, p84)
  • Borden (The Journey that Saved Curious George ) explores how war touches the lives of those seemingly far-removed from battle, partly basing this poignant story on her uncle, Theodore Taylor Walker, a WWII submariner lost at sea. Third-grader Molly Crenshaw lives next door to Ted Walker, who in 1943 serves on a submarine in the Pacific. Molly's first-person account offers snippets of her daily life in a presumably Midwestern town; she listens to broadcasts of baseball games, attends Beechwood School and writes to Ted. The free-verse narrative travels easily between Molly's life back home and what she imagines Ted's experience might be like aboard a submarine. The author intersperses facts about the war and submarines (e.g., submarines are named for fish and can be as long as a football field), and she links the two worlds together via a large world map painted by students ("There were so many islands./ Submarines like Ted's Albacore / were helping to capture those islands back,/ rescuing pilots shot down over the sea/ or figuring out where enemy fleets were"). Parker's (Ballet of the Elephants ) trademark pen-and-ink and watercolor wash illustrations alternately depict scenes from the submarine and from Molly's daily life. Drab gray and pale brown hues dominate the illustrations as people grieve when Ted goes missing in action just before Christmas. This elegant book speaks to the far-reaching effects of war and the healing power of memory. Ages 6-10. (Apr.) --Staff (Reviewed May 29, 2006) (Publishers Weekly, vol 253, issue 22, p58)
  • Embroidered details and the passage of time don't make this episode from the author's family history any less topical. Looking back to childhood years, Borden recalls next door neighbor Ted Walker, a young Navy man who served aboard a cruiser at the war's beginning, then moved to a submarine, and never came back. In sensitive prose arranged as free verse, she recounts time spent with him during his rare visits, of writing weekly letters and thinking of him, and how just the awareness that someone she knew was out there in harm's way brought the distant war so much closer to her familiar daily world. Parker illustrates with sketchy, subdued scenes that move from schoolrooms and summer porches to tense imagined encounters between enemy ships, then closes in the wake of the sad telegram's arrival—and later news of the war's end—with a view of the narrator ruminating, "about the next-door neighbors / on both sides of the war / who hadn't come home. / So many many neighbors." Other than the importance of keeping and passing on family stories, there's no overt message in this understated account—which makes it more likely to leave readers moved and thoughtful. (afterword) (Picture book. 7-9) (Kirkus Reviews, April 1, 2006)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
145932
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Borden, Louise
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
no index present
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/minGradeLevel
  • 2
  • 5
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Parker, Robert Andrew
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • World War, 1939-1945
  • Letter writing
  • Grief
  • Soldiers
Target audience
juvenile
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
a World War II story
Label
Across the blue Pacific : a World War II story, by Louise Borden ; illustrated by Robert Andrew Parker
Instantiates
Publication
Dimensions
24 x 29 cm.
Extent
1 v. (unpaged)
Isbn
9780544555525
Isbn Type
(pbk.)
Lccn
2004009206
Other physical details
col. ill.
System control number
  • (Sirsi) bwi09276582
  • (OCoLC)55108949
Label
Across the blue Pacific : a World War II story, by Louise Borden ; illustrated by Robert Andrew Parker
Publication
Dimensions
24 x 29 cm.
Extent
1 v. (unpaged)
Isbn
9780544555525
Isbn Type
(pbk.)
Lccn
2004009206
Other physical details
col. ill.
System control number
  • (Sirsi) bwi09276582
  • (OCoLC)55108949

Library Locations

    • Alpharetta BranchBorrow it
      10 Park Plaza, Alpharetta, GA, 30009, US
      34.073948 -84.292303
    • Buckhead BranchBorrow it
      269 Buckhead Ave. NE, Atlanta, GA, 30305, US
      33.837616 -84.379393
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