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The Resource Conversations with McCartney, Paul du Noyer

Conversations with McCartney, Paul du Noyer

Label
Conversations with McCartney
Title
Conversations with McCartney
Statement of responsibility
Paul du Noyer
Creator
Author
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Has edition
Writing style
Review
  • Du Noyer, founding editor of Mojo magazine, has interviewed Sir Paul McCartney many times since 1989, and in this sometimes cloying collection, readers get to hear the seemingly ageless former Beatle discuss a variety of topics: songwriting, religion and spirituality, his enduring relationship with Linda Eastman, his reflections on the breakup of the Beatles and life after the group. The interviews alternate between insightful and bland regardless of subject. On the making of Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, for example, McCartney recalls that they were “fed up being ‘The Beatles’ ” and asked, “Why don’t we pretend that we’re another band? Make up a name for it, make up alter egos, so we can make a whole album from the point of view of this other band?” On touring: “It’s never the last tour as far as I’m concerned... I’ve always said I’ll be wheeled on when I’m ninety.” McCartney also points to the moment when the Beatles’ music significantly changed, with the 1966 release of Revolver: “It started to be art... it changed from showbiz to art.” Du Noyer’s book offers a glimpse of one wide-eyed fan’s conversations with his hero, and it will mostly appeal to McCartney fans who wish they were in Du Noyer’s shoes. (Oct.) --Staff (Reviewed 10/10/2016) (Publishers Weekly, vol 263, issue 41, p)
  • John Lennon never wrote a memoir, and so far Paul McCartney has resisted the idea of an autobiography, but in two new books the musicians through their own words speak with candor and reflection, bringing an intimate and revealing look into their already well-examined lives. As one of rock's most self-searching and questing artists, Lennon's conversations were mixtures of wit, naked openness, and political and social commentary. Editor Burger (Springsteen on Springsteen) has selected 19 interviews from print, radio, and television, most either never published in print or not easily accessible today. The transcripts are presented chronologically, providing a background introduction that contextualizes each. From an early radio interview in 1964 to the famous Dick Cavett TV appearances of 1971 and concluding with an interview done only hours before his tragic murder in 1980, Lennon's sardonic humor, intelligence, and honesty are displayed in these revealing discussions. Music, activism, songwriting, and, of course, the Beatles are all topics woven together throughout the pieces. --James Collins (Reviewed 10/01/2016) (Library Journal, vol 141, issue 16, p84)
  • “The world’s most famous living Liverpudlian” speaks.McCartney has never been shy of speaking his mind. Here, he opens up, repeatedly and over several decades, to longtime NME correspondent and founding Mojo editor Du Noyer (Deaf School: The Non-Stop Pop Art Punk Rock Party, 2013, etc.) on all manner of topics, not least of them “the world’s most famous dead Liverpudlian,” he being, of course, fellow Beatle John Lennon. Sir Paul’s not just a Beatle, though he will go to his grave with that designation first and foremost. To judge by Du Noyer’s portrait, he is the cheeky and cheerful fellow of popular depiction, though he is also deeply thoughtful and capable of self-criticism, if not always very trenchant. Since Lennon’s murder 36 years ago, McCartney has labored to rebuild his image as the lite-pop Beatle against Lennon’s rocker, and here his conversations sometimes turn to such things as his Little Richard shout and penchant for blistering rockers like “Helter Skelter.” There are surprises aplenty for Beatles casualists; who knew that Linda sang the highest of the high notes on “Let It Be”? Du Noyer’s book has a slightly slapped-together feel, as if raw material for a more cohesive biography in times to come, but for all that, it contains bits and pieces that are suggestive and illuminating. At one point, McCartney recounts, for instance, being stuck in writing the song that would become “Drive My Car,” which well illustrates his thesis that the whole business of songwriting involves “some kind of mystery as to whether you’re going to pull it off.” Happily, Du Noyer concentrates on the substantive in these conversations, which are both thematically and chronologically arranged, avoiding celebrity fluff to get into the meat—beg pardon, Sir Paul being a vocal vegetarian and all—of his work. A welcome contribution to a growing body of serious but not solemn work about The Fabs before and after, the cute bassist in particular.(Kirkus Reviews, January 1, 1900)
Biography type
individual biography
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10526749
Cataloging source
FMG
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Du Noyer, Paul
Illustrations
  • illustrations
  • plates
Index
index present
LC call number
ML410.M115
LC item number
D86 2016
Literary form
non fiction
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • McCartney, Paul
  • Rock musicians
  • Rock musicians
Label
Conversations with McCartney, Paul du Noyer
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Note
Includes index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
xv, 352 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates
Isbn
9781468313406
Isbn Type
(hbk.)
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations (some color)
System control number
(OCoLC)958953370
Label
Conversations with McCartney, Paul du Noyer
Publication
Copyright
Note
Includes index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
xv, 352 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates
Isbn
9781468313406
Isbn Type
(hbk.)
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations (some color)
System control number
(OCoLC)958953370

Library Locations

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      33.672616 -84.574193
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