The Resource Luv ya bunches, by Lauren Myracle

Luv ya bunches, by Lauren Myracle

Label
Luv ya bunches
Title
Luv ya bunches
Statement of responsibility
by Lauren Myracle
Title variation
  • Love ya bunches
  • Luv you bunches
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
Four friends--each named after a flower--navigate the ups and downs of fifth grade. Told through text messages, blog posts, screenplay, and straight narrative
Member of
Storyline
Tone
Writing style
Character
Review
  • Gr. 4-6 /*Starred Review*/ Myracle, author of ttyl (2004), ttfn (2006), and l8r, g8r (2007), displays a shining awareness of and sensitivity to the highly textured society of tween girls. Four 10-year-olds provide the viewpoints in alternating chapters: out-there, somewhat immature and unself-conscious Katie-Rose; “invisible” hijab-wearing Yasaman; new girl Violet; and overly accommodating, nervous Camilla. The plot revolves around the maintenance and eventual destruction of a mean queen-bee girl’s inner circle and the formation of a solid and healthy—though developmentally credible—friendship among the four protagonists. In addition to more traditional prose, the narrative unfolds in instant messages, video scripting, and blog posts, a dynamic style Myracle carries off with grace and accessibility. Each of the girls happens to inhabit a different detail of the contemporary American rainbow, but these characteristics are referenced only when relevant and not with a heavy hand. Altogether, this is a fun, challenging, and gently edifying story with loads of potential for popularity among its target audience, and plenty of insights for those who care about tween girls. -- Goldsmith, Francisca (Reviewed 09-15-2009) (Booklist, vol 106, number 2, p58)
  • Gr 3–6— Love Ya Bunches doesn't offer anything new. Four fifth graders become friends while fighting off Modessa, aka Medusa, your standard mean girl. The main characters, named for flowers, represent four ethnicities, which seems like a ploy except for a few fascinating discussions of customs. Violet, an African-American who is despondent because her mother is away due to mental problems, comes off as too precocious about social cues. Ignored Yasaman, a Muslim computer genius, creates a Web site only friends share. Bouncy, bossy, half-Chinese Katie-Rose makes videos. Anxious Milla (Camilla), a blond with lesbian mothers, is in thrall to Modessa. When she loses her lucky bobble-head turtle, Violet hides it for reasons even she can't discern. She arranges for Modessa to find it, thinking she'll give it to Milla. Instead, the meanie plants it in Katie-Rose's backpack and accuses her of stealing it. The truth comes out and the four wreak revenge of a mild sort on Modessa. Using movie scripts, chat, and standard narrative no longer seems innovative but does make for a breezy book. The four friends are depicted in a manga style of art. The book is at its best when Violet lets her guard down and allows her father to comfort her. But too often it's as two-dimensional as the doll-like figures on its cover.—Tina Zubak, Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, PA --Tina Zubak (Reviewed November 1, 2009) (School Library Journal, vol 55, issue 11, p116)
  • Blending instant messaging and screenplay-styled text into the narrative, Myracle (ttyl ) begins a new series about the woes of being a tween, featuring four likable heroines all named after flowers. Katie Rose, Camilla (aka Milla), Yasaman and Violet come from different backgrounds and have distinct passions and insecurities (Yasaman is Muslim and an expert with computers; Milla, who has two mothers, struggles with her sense of self). But each could use a new friend as she begins fifth grade (“What Katie-Rose wants is a real friend, the kind that lasts forever”). Their shared distaste for meanness and their enthusiasm for the social networking site that Yasaman creates help draw the girls together—and their desire to get revenge against cruel queen bee Modessa, who has hurt each of them at some point, seals their camaraderie. The novel sends something of a mixed message about the acceptability of teasing as the girls’ plot their own prank in response to Modessa’s machinations. Still, readers will find the girls’ voices enticing and should be able to relate to their conflicts and inner anxieties. Ages 9–13.(Oct.) --Staff (Reviewed October 5, 2009) (Publishers Weekly, vol 256, issue 40, p50)
  • Katie-Rose, Yasaman, Violet and Milla each occupy a different point in the fifth-grade social pecking order: Bossy, movie-obsessed Katie-Rose is at the bottom with Yasaman, whose hijab-wearing quietude belies her sharp insight and impressive computer geekery. New girl Violet has serious cool potential but is tortured by worries over her institutionalized mother, while fundamentally nice but deeply anxious Milla can't disentangle herself from Mean Girl–in-chief Modessa (fittingly called Medusa by Katie-Rose) and her henchwoman, Quin. With the blend of IM, texting, screenplay format, blog posts and standard narrative familiar from Myracle's ttfn series, each chapter shifts perspective, letting readers see the action from each girl's point of view. The plot is thin but perfectly captures tweens' concerns about social machinations, fitting in and finding a trustworthy group of pals, existing primarily to bring together the fabulously diverse foursome as they put a fitting, funny end to Modessa's reign of terror. It's no classic, but this series launch will be embraced, read and passed from friend to friend on middle-school playgrounds everywhere. (Fiction. 9-12) (Kirkus Reviews, September 1, 2009)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
332841
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1969-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Myracle, Lauren
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
no index present
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/minGradeLevel
  • 3
  • 6
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
Series statement
Flower power books
Series volume
0001
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Friendship
  • Schools
Target audience
pre adolescent
Label
Luv ya bunches, by Lauren Myracle
Instantiates
Publication
Dimensions
21 cm.
Extent
335 p.
Isbn
9780810942110
Isbn Type
(Harry N. Abrams, Inc.)
Lccn
2009012585
Other physical details
ill.
System control number
  • (Sirsi) o317927235
  • (OCoLC)317927235
Label
Luv ya bunches, by Lauren Myracle
Publication
Dimensions
21 cm.
Extent
335 p.
Isbn
9780810942110
Isbn Type
(Harry N. Abrams, Inc.)
Lccn
2009012585
Other physical details
ill.
System control number
  • (Sirsi) o317927235
  • (OCoLC)317927235

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