The Resource The lesser bohemians, Eimear McBride

The lesser bohemians, Eimear McBride

Label
The lesser bohemians
Title
The lesser bohemians
Statement of responsibility
Eimear McBride
Creator
Author
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Storyline
Tone
Writing style
Character
Award
James Tait Black Memorial Prize for Fiction, 2016.
Review
  • /* Starred Review */ As in her first novel, A Girl Is a Half-Formed Thing (2014), McBride molds unrestrained language to imaginative effect, using punctuation sparely and styling dialogue and page space unconventionally. It’s jarring at first, but perhaps even more jarring when all this is scarcely noticed, and only its imprint absorbed. An Irish girl, just moved to London for theater school in the mid-1990s, meets a charming stranger, also an actor and much older than her. (Neither character is named for well over half the novel.) At a bar, they bond over his copy of Dostoyevsky’s The Devils and go back to his place for charming, clumsy sex (her first). She doesn’t expect much, until, quickly, things change. Sometimes serendipitously, but more often on purpose, they’re together and the sex becomes far from clumsy. Occasionally he’s aloof, and she distracts herself with drink, drug, and other men to not think of him, painfully and unsuccessfully. Wonder about his past, much longer than hers, consumes her until all at once he tells her his story, and it’s this narrative of unfathomable abuse, addiction, and redemption that nearly becomes another novel inside this one. Divided into the terms of an academic year, this is, above all, a love story: bare, achingly romantic, and crushingly felt. -- Bostrom, Annie (Reviewed 9/1/2016) (Booklist, vol 113, number 1, p46)
  • McBride’s second novel is more ambitious than her acclaimed debut, A Girl Is a Half-Formed Thing, and it retains the uncompromisingly Joycean brogue and diary-like intimations of adolescence that made that first novel such a success. Set between 1994 and 1995, it follows 18-year-old Eily, a boozy ingénue, as she leaves her native Ireland to attend drama school in London. There, caught in whirl of excess and the shadow of IRA terrorism, she is mostly assigned stereotypically Irish bit parts, but finds herself captivated by a much older actor named Stephen, an ex-junkie estranged from his family and young daughter. Initially meeting without names, they embark on a tempestuous relationship that reveals the worst in both while offering Stephen a chance at redemption and Eily a future. But the real focus is McBride’s stream-of-consciousness prose, in which drinking is rendered as “pints turning telescope,” “the lightless hall sings sanctuary from the frenzy” of a violent encounter, and a night of youthful debauchery leaves the revelers with “Satan under every skin. Skinful under all our skin.” The story (especially when Stephen’s backstory hijacks the narrative) isn’t full enough to sustain McBride’s style, which comes to seem less and less an accurate shorthand for first love. Still, this sophomore effort is striking enough to continue McBride’s forging of a daring career. (Sept.) --Staff (Reviewed 07/04/2016) (Publishers Weekly, vol 263, issue 27, p)
  • Having won multiple honors (e.g., the Baileys Women's Prize) for her brilliant and coruscating first novel, A Girl Is a Half-Formed Thing, McBride returns with the story of a naïve 18-year-old Irish lass studying acting in mid-1990s London. Naturally, she launches an affair with an established actor 20 years her senior. With a 75,000-copy first printing. --Barbara Hoffert (Reviewed 04/15/2016) (Library Journal, vol 141, issue 7, p62)
  • The follow-up to A Girl Is a Half-Formed Thing (2014), the author's groundbreaking, award-winning debut novel.It's 1994 in London, and McBride's narrator, 18-year-old Eily, arrives from Ireland to begin drama school. Wide-eyed and awed by the city and all its cacophonous activity, she soon meets an older actor in a bar (reading "his Penguin Dostoyevsky") and embarks on a torrid—and increasingly tumultuous—love affair with him. Though he's 20 years her senior, it's clear that he doesn't necessarily have it all figured out; as the narrative progresses, we learn more about his skeleton-filled closet, details that help partially explain his erratic behavior. Most of the novel consists of Eily's pulsing, fractured thoughts concerning her psychosexual awakening, though her lover's lengthy disclosure of his past demons throws the narrative somewhat off-balance. Many of the trademarks of McBride's first novel are present here—intense first-person interiority (details about the narrator's surroundings are largely absent; for the majority of the book, readers are inside the occasionally claustrophobic confines of Eily's head); halting, Joycean sentence construction; passionate, urgent descriptions of conflicting emotions—and fans should enjoy this one. However, it's not likely to win the author many new readers. While A Girl Is a Half-Formed Thing masterfully captured the narrator's mental and emotional states across a range of ages, Eily remains stagnant in her obsessive pursuit of her addictive new love, and the novel runs about 50 pages too long. Still, the author is a confident stylist and produces enough dazzling sentences to keep the pages turning—e.g., describing a scene in which Eily and others snort cocaine, McBride writes, "ponytails like tidal waves slap tabletops and nostrils butterfly."A unique, mostly engaging work from a talented writer who will hopefully take another step forward in her next novel.(Kirkus Reviews, July 15, 2016)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10518638
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
McBride, Eimear
Index
no index present
LC call number
PR6113.C337
LC item number
L47 2016
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Man-woman relationships
  • Theater
Label
The lesser bohemians, Eimear McBride
Instantiates
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Dimensions
25 cm
Edition
First United States edition.
Extent
310 pages
Isbn
9781101903483
Lccn
2016034004
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(OCoLC)933567547
Label
The lesser bohemians, Eimear McBride
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Dimensions
25 cm
Edition
First United States edition.
Extent
310 pages
Isbn
9781101903483
Lccn
2016034004
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(OCoLC)933567547

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