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The Resource The second empress : a novel of Napoleon's court, Michelle Moran

The second empress : a novel of Napoleon's court, Michelle Moran

Label
The second empress : a novel of Napoleon's court
Title
The second empress
Title remainder
a novel of Napoleon's court
Statement of responsibility
Michelle Moran
Title variation
second empress
Title variation remainder
a novel of Napoleons court
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Storyline
Tone
Writing style
Review
  • Opening her new novel (after Madame Tussaud) in 1809, Moran studiously applies her research into Napoleon and his family to compelling fiction. Ostensibly the portrait of Marie-Louise of Austria, who became Napoleon’s second wife, the novel’s title could as easily apply to the emperor’s sister, Pauline. Her sexual exploits, unnatural closeness to her brother, and obsession with ancient Egypt contribute delightful color. She badgers Napoleon to ignore Russia, divorce his new wife, and establish their kingdom in Egypt, which, following the example of the Ptolemies, they could rule as both brother-and-sister and husband-and-wife. Effortlessly switching the point of view from Marie-Louise to Pauline to Pauline’s Haitian chamberlain, Paul, the picture of Napoleon that emerges is less than favorable, unlike that of Marie-Louise. Great-niece of Marie Antoinette, she was raised to serve as regent for her younger brother and educated like a king. When Napoleon left her as regent, she exhibited a remarkable ability to rule. The empire brought great wealth to France, and Napoleon and his family spent it with abandon. Another enjoyable historical from Moran. Agent: Daniel Lazar, Writers House. (Aug.) --Staff (Reviewed June 25, 2012) (Publishers Weekly, vol 259, issue 26, p)
  • With last year's Madame Tussaud , the author of saga favorites like The Heretic Queen left behind Egypt for France. This book is not a sequel to Moran's portrait of the celebrated wax sculptor but a re-creation of Napoleon's famously bawdy court, focusing on three women: Napoleon's stepdaughter, Hortense Beauharnais; his sister Pauline, who bedded everyone, including, quite likely, her brother; and his wife, Marie-Louise, eager to be quit of her capricious husband. Moran draws extensively on the liberal documentation all three women left behind. Lots of publicity. --Barbara Hoffert (Reviewed March 15, 2012) (Library Journal, vol 137, issue 05, p92)
  • The last six years of Napoleon's empire, as witnessed by Bonaparte's sister, her Haitian retainer and the Hapsburg princess Empress Marie-Louise, Joséphine's successor. Title aside, this is an ensemble piece in which the above three narrators carry equal weight. Marie-Louise, daughter of the Austrian Holy Roman Emperor Francis II, tries to avoid a match with Bonaparte, whose conquest of Europe has bankrupted her father's kingdom. However, no one dares refuse Napoleon, even though he is not yet divorced from first wife Joséphine, who still has the title of empress. Brought to Napoleon's palace in the Tuileries, Marie-Louise is shocked by the degree to which his large, squabbling Corsican family holds sway over the conqueror. His sister, Pauline, who may be suffering from the mentally debilitating effects of mercury treatment for gonorrhea, pictures herself as Cleopatra, surrounded by the spoils of her brother's victory in Egypt, dreaming of ruling at his side as his incestuous consort. Although she initially befriends the young second empress, Pauline continues to machinate against her, particularly after Marie-Louise gives birth to Napoleon's longed-for male heir, Franz. Pauline's devoted chamberlain, Paul, son of a French planter and an African slave, is at first devoted, even infatuated with Pauline, who rescued him after his family was massacred during the Haitian revolution. However, her antics (she uses female courtiers as footstools, bathes in milk and is unabashedly promiscuous) and scheming erode Paul's admiration. After Napoleon's ill-fated Russian campaign results in his disgrace and temporary exile to Elba, all three narrators return to their true homes: Marie-Louise to Austria and her lover, Count Adam Neipperg; Paul to Haiti; and Pauline to her brother's side to help him plan his short-lived return to power. With excerpts from Napoleon's and Josephine's (always cordial, even post-rupture) correspondence thrown in, the novel is mostly unfocused, other than to demonstrate how fortunate (and undeserving) Napoleon was to be surrounded by such loyal, or at least dutiful, women. Richly detailed but diffuse.(Kirkus Reviews, August 1, 2012)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10130023
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Moran, Michelle
Index
no index present
LC call number
PS3613.O682
LC item number
S43 2012
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Young women
  • Napoleon
  • France
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
a novel of Napoleon's court
Label
The second empress : a novel of Napoleon's court, Michelle Moran
Instantiates
Publication
Dimensions
25 cm.
Edition
1st ed.
Extent
312 p.
Isbn
9780307953032
Lccn
2012017691
System control number
  • (Sirsi) o764335953
  • (Sirsi) o764335953
  • (OCoLC)764335953
Label
The second empress : a novel of Napoleon's court, Michelle Moran
Publication
Dimensions
25 cm.
Edition
1st ed.
Extent
312 p.
Isbn
9780307953032
Lccn
2012017691
System control number
  • (Sirsi) o764335953
  • (Sirsi) o764335953
  • (OCoLC)764335953

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