Coverart for item
The Resource The swamp : the Everglades, Florida, and the politics of paradise, Michael Grunwald

The swamp : the Everglades, Florida, and the politics of paradise, Michael Grunwald

Label
The swamp : the Everglades, Florida, and the politics of paradise
Title
The swamp
Title remainder
the Everglades, Florida, and the politics of paradise
Statement of responsibility
Michael Grunwald
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
Includes information on agriculture, aquifers, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Bruce Babbitt, Napoleon Bonaparte Broward, Joe Browder, Jeb Bush, Central and Southern Florida Project, Bill Clinton, Hamilton Disston, Marjory Stoneman Douglas, Everglades Coalition, fish, Al Gore, Bob Graham, Spessard Holland, hurricanes, Indians, Internal Improvement Fund, Kissimmee Chain of Lakes, Kissimmee River, Arthur R. Marshall, Jr., Miami, Miccosukee Indians, Lake Okeechobee, phosphorus, railroads, rainfall, Nathaniel Pryor Reed, River of Grass, Seminole Indians, Shark Slough, South Florida, wading birds, water, wetlands, wildlife, James Wright, etc
Writing style
Review
  • /* Starred Review */ Washington Post reporter Grunwald brings the zeal of his profession—and the skill that won him a Society of Environmental Journalists Award in 2003—to this enthralling story of "the river of grass" that starry-eyed social engineers and greedy developers have diverted, drained and exploited for more than a century. In 1838, fewer than 50 white people lived in south Florida, and the Everglades was seen as a vast and useless bog. By the turn of this century, more than seven million people lived there (and 40 million tourists visited annually). Escalating demands of new residents after WWII were sapping the Everglades of its water and decimating the shrinking swamp's wildlife. But in a remarkable political and environmental turnaround, chronicled here with a Washington insider's savvy, Republicans and Democrats came together in 2000 to launch the largest ecosystem restoration project in America's history. This detailed account doesn't shortchange the environmental story—including an account of the senseless fowl hunts that provoked abolitionist Harriet Beecher Stowe's 1877 broadside "Protect the Birds." But Grunwald's emphasis on the role politics played in first despoiling and now reclaiming the Everglades gives this important book remarkable heft. 18 pages of b&w photos; 7 maps. (Mar.) --Staff (Reviewed December 19, 2005) (Publishers Weekly, vol 252, issue 50, p51)
  • /* Starred Review */ A lively appreciation of the Everglades as an ecosystem worthy of care and protection—quite a turnaround in attitude, as Washington Post reporter Grunwald reveals.The natural Everglades encompasses an area twice the size of New Jersey, and it lacks both immediately spectacular features and elevation: One "pass" there is marked at a mere three feet above sea level. Yet huge quantities of freshwater slowly roll down the Everglades; as Grunwald writes, "a raindrop that fell in its headwaters in central Florida could have taken an entire year to dribble down to its estuaries at the tip of the peninsula." Nineteenth-century white explorers damned the "Sea of Grass" for its heat, mosquitoes, vast store of reptiles, renegade Indians and runaway slaves, but speculators and capitalists came along who recognized a couple of salient facts: Rich in organic peat, the Everglades could be an agricultural paradise, and it could sustain whole cities. All that was needed was to remake the place entirely—drain the swamps, build vast canals and railroads, divide it into cozy lots. Grunwald's account of the con games and fly-by-nights that made modern South Florida possible is a learned entertainment, though it becomes somewhat less amusing once it's known that the same actors and forces are in play today; one illustrative moment comes when Jeb Bush, governor of Florida and brother of the president, came close to selling off Florida's water rights in the Everglades for the pittance offered by a little company called Azurix, "an aggressive new player in the $400 billion global water market"—and, as it happens, a subsidiary of Enron. Happily, the deal didn't go through. More happily still, Grunwald writes that many wide-ranging measures to help restore the Everglades have been successful.Still, "drive through the region's strip-mall hellscapes," Grunwald concludes, and it's clear that much remains to be done to save the Everglades. This lucid history and call to arms is an essential companion to that work. (Kirkus Reviews, February 15, 2006)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
165985
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1970-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Grunwald, Michael
Illustrations
  • illustrations
  • maps
Index
index present
LC call number
F317.E9
LC item number
G78 2006
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Environmental protection
  • Drainage
  • Everglades (Fla.)
  • Everglades (Fla.)
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
the Everglades, Florida, and the politics of paradise
Label
The swamp : the Everglades, Florida, and the politics of paradise, Michael Grunwald
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 371-432) and index
Dimensions
25 cm.
Extent
450 p.
Isbn
9780743251051
Isbn Type
(hbk.)
Lccn
2005056329
Other physical details
ill., maps
System control number
  • (Sirsi) o62282556
  • (OCoLC)62282556
Label
The swamp : the Everglades, Florida, and the politics of paradise, Michael Grunwald
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 371-432) and index
Dimensions
25 cm.
Extent
450 p.
Isbn
9780743251051
Isbn Type
(hbk.)
Lccn
2005056329
Other physical details
ill., maps
System control number
  • (Sirsi) o62282556
  • (OCoLC)62282556

Library Locations

    • Milton BranchBorrow it
      855 Mayfield Rd, Milton, GA, 30009, US
      34.090136 -84.336532
    • Roswell BranchBorrow it
      115 Norcross Street, Roswell, GA, 30075, US
      34.025015 -84.357937
    • Wolf Creek BranchBorrow it
      3100 Enon Road, Atlanta, GA, 30331, US
      33.672616 -84.574193
Processing Feedback ...