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The Resource The war of the flowers, Tad Williams

The war of the flowers, Tad Williams

Label
The war of the flowers
Title
The war of the flowers
Statement of responsibility
Tad Williams
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Storyline
Tone
Writing style
Award
Library Journal Best Books, 2003.
Review
  • Williams’ latest is unsurprisingly large but is billed as a single-volume work, which is pretty flabbergasting coming from a writer addicted to series of massive tomes. The story begins with the fairly conventional device of a mundane (i.e., a person from our world) stumbling into Faerie. Marginal California rocker Theo Vilmos has just lost his pregnant girlfriend when he discovers an old, handwritten book in a rural cottage. The gritty and even rather grim faerie world to which it leads him is hardly a refuge from reality; indeed, it is so full of depressing details that those who are already somewhat down should consider reading the book only in bite-size chunks. The war of the title is one of numerous factions fighting among themselves, and with it, Williams darkly satirizes every sort and condition of politics, ideology, religion, and other human foibles, much as he did in the Otherland saga. Reader and hero alike remain in some confusion for some while, because Theo’s Faerie guide, an obnoxious entity named Applecore, seems to have an agenda of his own and certainly has a stevedore’s tongue. Williams has a supremely powerful, if not altogether disciplined, imagination, so that, like Theo, readers may feel they are encountering much that is dreary and dull on the way to the good parts. (Reviewed April 15, 2003) -- Roland Green
  • /* Starred Review */ Travel into another dimension is a popular fantasy ploy, but rarely accomplished with such humor, terror and even logic as in this stand-alone by bestseller Williams (Tailchaser's Song , etc.). After losing his girlfriend, Theo Vilmos, a singer in a humdrum northern California rock band, finds in his late mother's remote cabin an amazing if incomplete manuscript left by his eccentric great-uncle, Eamonn Dowd, about a fairy world purportedly visited by its author. Unsurprisingly, Faerie turns out to be a real place. Applecore, a short-tempered, red-haired sprite, abruptly appears before Theo just as a horrifying monster starts banging on the door. At Applecore's command, Theo swoops her up and pops through "the Gate" into a magical realm that proves initially beguiling, later strange and finally deadly. Ironically, Faerie is a distorted image of our own world, ruled by cruel fairy tyrants. The powerful classes, each named for a flower, wage war against each other, using colossal dragons as the equivalents of nuclear bombs. Theo discovers love as well as unsuspected secrets of his own birth and family. Williams's imagination is boundless, and if this big book could have been shorter, it could just as easily have been longer. The incorrigible Applecore continually delights, as in her comment on a famous J.M. Barrie character: " 'If you believe in fairies, clap your hands'? If you believe in fairies, kiss my rosy pink arse is more like it." (June 3) FYI: Williams is the author of Sea of Silver Light (Forecasts, Apr. 9, 2001) and other titles in his Otherland series. --Staff (Reviewed April 28, 2003) (Publishers Weekly, vol 250, issue 17, p54)
  • Struggling rock musician Theo Vilmos has nightmares, a pregnant girlfriend, an aloof mother, and only one good friend—until the bottom falls out of his world, leaving him alone and down on his luck. His discovery of a book written by a long-dead relative launches a series of events that plummet him headlong into the land of Faerie and thrusts him into the middle of a political and social maelstrom. Hunted by the ruling families of Faerie, Theo finds an unlikely ally, a foul-mouthed sprite named Applecore, who introduces him to the complexities of life in another world. As his understanding of the realm's dark secrets grows, Theo becomes caught up in a full-scale revolution that could mean freedom for the downtrodden "lesser" faeries or a gruesome death for himself and, possibly, the end of his world. Williams's latest novel draws on the faerie lore of many nations, putting an intriguing new twist on old legends. Strong storytelling and memorable characters make this standalone cross-world fantasy the author's best work to date and a priority purchase for fantasy collections. Highly recommended. --Jackie Cassada (Reviewed May 15, 2003) (Library Journal, vol 128, issue 9, p131)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
119321
Cataloging source
PWmBRO
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Williams, Tad
Index
index present
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Parallel universes
  • Power (Social sciences)
  • Fairies
  • Rock musicians
  • Social classes
  • Social conflict
  • Grief
  • Loss (Psychology)
  • Secrets
  • California
Label
The war of the flowers, Tad Williams
Instantiates
Publication
Dimensions
24 cm.
Extent
xiii, 686 p.
Isbn
9780756401351
System control number
  • (Sirsi) BRD55765203
  • CARL0623456848
  • (OCoLC)52112768
Label
The war of the flowers, Tad Williams
Publication
Dimensions
24 cm.
Extent
xiii, 686 p.
Isbn
9780756401351
System control number
  • (Sirsi) BRD55765203
  • CARL0623456848
  • (OCoLC)52112768

Library Locations

    • Palmetto BranchBorrow it
      9111 Cascade Palmetto Hwy, Palmetto, GA, 30268, US
      33.53057 -84.664268
    • Wolf Creek BranchBorrow it
      3100 Enon Road, Atlanta, GA, 30331, US
      33.672616 -84.574193
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